Archive for tag 'Jason Scott'

Open Apple on the Internet Archive

The Internet Archive, perhaps best known for its Wayback Machine, got a bump in popularity among Apple II users last year when noted KansasFest alumnus Jason Scott joined its staff. Suddenly, the work of our own community was being inducted into this vast collection. Open Apple co-host Mike Maginnis was one of the first, with his free and legal scans of Computist being added to the Archive, granting several benefits:

The issues are protected under the auspices of a library, and can be checked out by anyone who wants to head over there and read them online, or download the original PDFs, or anything else that might grab their fancy. It provides, along with Mike’s site and collection, a non-profit registered-library home dedicated to its preservation, and that’s pretty darn cool.

There’s another practical reason for anyone to contribute to this effort. As we discussed in the October episode of Open Apple, some retrocomputing enthusiasts feel that "There really does need to be a giant site for Apple II info though. [There are] too many small non-comprehensive sites out there." Although there is strength in our community’s diversity such that it may not behoove us to consolidate our efforts, a single repository to serve as at least a backup of our output is just good sense. Whatever the fates and whims of the Apple II’s aging content creators, the Internet Archive ensures that their products will live on beyond them.

Starting today, all past episodes of Open Apple will be available from the Internet Archive. They can be downloaded in their original MP3 format as well as Ogg Vorbis, both under the same Creative Commons license with which they were originally published.

We intend the Archive to be a timeless mechanism for discovery of our show, documenting the legacy and passion that produced an Apple II podcast. That said, the Archive’s collection by its nature lacks the exhaustive show notes that are a companion to every episode, and the latest episode will always be available exclusively at Open-Apple.net.

We’ll continue expanding the Internet Archive with new episodes for some time to come — so stay tuned as we make history!

Rob KenyonThis month on the Open Apple podcast, Mike and Ken are joined by Rob Kenyon, a two-time KansasFest attendee as well as a professional programmer and 30-year veteran of the Apple II. We talk about how great it is to be a part of the international community of Apple II users, even if none of us can afford to buy Apple’s founding contract in a Sotheby’s auction. Rob asks, did Steve Jobs purposely kill HyperCard to turn the Mac into a more closed environment? We congratulate Wade Clarke and Andrew Schultz on their showing in the 17th annual Interactive Fiction Competition. Plenty of original Apple II computers are selling on eBay, with Mike and Rob discussing how to distinguish an authentic classic from a modified one. We share our wishes for the holiday season, including for an affordable accelerator card and a CFFA3000, before signing off for the calendar year. Please take our listener survey, and see you in 2012!

[Please note: technical difficulties have resulted in a low volume on Ken’s track, and a loud volume for Rob. Our apologies for the inconvenience.]

Click past the jump for links mentioned in this episode.

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Melissa BarronThis month in Open Apple, Mike and Ken talk with Melissa Barron, the Apple II community’s famed tapestry artist. The three relate their experiences exploring the past and future of computer media at conventions and museums in Chicago and Rochester, exploring the methods used to create and preserve history. Further tributes are made to Steve Jobs, while Mike Westerfield reclassifies old BASIC tools and releases new ones. Lord British’s Texas mansion is up for sale — a fitting home for Vintage Computer Festival Southwest? We debate various models of floppy drives and are wary of fake and expensive Apple II computers on eBay but excited about new e-books and iOS apps of interest to retrocomputing enthusiasts.

Congratulations to Todd Holcomb, who named the game as Spy’s Demise! He won an autographed copy of Bob Bishop’s Bomber on cassette, courtesy Mike Maginnis.

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Show #8 (Oct 2011): Kelvin Sherlock, Kickstarter, BASIC, and BCS

Kelvin SherlockThis month in Open Apple, Mike and Ken talk with Kelvin Sherlock, prolific Apple II programmer of GShisen, Silver Platter, ProFUSE, and more. Ken builds the suspense before revealing the identity of KansasFest 2012’s keynote speaker before we look at the latest Kickstarter fundraising projects that appeal to Apple II users. We ask ourselves, “Why are Apple II users different?” when sharing knowledge, products, and magazines. On eBay, we’re looking at soundtracks, CP/M cards, compression software, and defunct user group newsletters, before engaging in a smackdown of BASIC programming languages. Finally, we enjoy classic Apple II games on iOS and challenge Kelvin to explain why we can’t port Portal to the 6502.

Congratulations to Sal Bugliarisi, who named the game as Choplifter! He won a $20 credit to the Juiced.GS store, courtesy publisher Gamebits. Our next winner gets an autographed copy of Bob Bishop‘s Bomber on cassette.

Click past the jump for links mentioned in this episode.

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